Category: Hepatitis
Various studies have shown that the progression of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is slower and liver damage tends to be less severe in women than in men. Women who do have chronic HCV tend not to develop cirrhosis (scarring), liver cancer, or liver failure as rapidly as men. A majority of people with chronic HCV never develop serious liver damage. Among those who do, the process usually takes years or even decades. Some experts believe that the female hormone estrogen protects women from liver damage. If this is the case, the protective effect may diminish after menopause, as women's bodies produce less of the hormone.
 
Alternative medicine (sometimes called complementary or holistic medicine) can be a useful tool in helping your body to heal from the effects of the hepatitis C virus (HCV).
 
Hepatitis C is one of six viruses causing inflammation of the liver, with Hepatitis C (HCV) being considered the most serious among them, causing 60 to 70 percent of chronic hepatitis cases.
 
Diet is an important element in any healing regime. Eating wholesome, nourishing foods helps support the work of the liver in its struggle to throw off the HCV virus while still doing its job in filtering out other harmful elements that may cause us damage.
 
Like the little red warning lights on the dashboard of your car, pain is your body's way of indicating that there is something wrong. Once you have consulted with your physician to discover the source of the problem, there are various ways of making the pain more manageable.
 
A person must give their consent to be tested for HCV. Your healthcare provider can use a few different tests to see if you have the hepatitis C virus (HCV), how much of the virus is present in your body, and if any damage has been done to your liver.
 
A person must give their consent to be tested for HCV. Your healthcare provider can use a few different tests to see if you have the hepatitis C virus (HCV), how much of the virus is present in your body, and if any damage has been done to your liver.
 
If you receive a diagnosis of hepatitis C, your doctor will likely recommend certain lifestyle changes.
 
Because no effective vaccine for hepatitis C (HCV) yet exists, the only way to protect yourself is to avoid becoming infected. The high mutability of the HCV genome complicates vaccine development. There are some hopeful trials being conducted that may eventually lead to an effective vaccine, but in the meantime, other methods of prevention are the best option.
 
Up to 80% of people with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have no signs or symptoms of the disease, even though they may carry it for many years. You can look and feel perfectly healthy, yet still be infected with HCV and infect others. Most patients do not have any hepatitis C symptoms until there is already cirrhosis, or even liver failure.
 
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